Monthly Archives: March 2011

Recipes, recipes, recipes

  It is bright and a mere 30 degrees this morning, a good sign. Yet there’s still plenty of snow on the ground in my garden. There are days when I think that gardening is like cooking is like painting.  … Continue reading

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Compost, Part One

I am thinking about compost. Here’s why: Ben Hewitt, farmer, writer, activist, and author of The Town That Food Saved, How One Community Found Vitality in Local Food, led a discussion up at the college recently.  He admitted that rather … Continue reading

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Fixing Raised Beds

The snow has finally melted and I have started the inventory of winter damage. For the first time in fifteen years, there are corners to repair on the raised beds. This takes me back to when we built the beds, … Continue reading

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What’s Up

A version of this post appeared on Eating Well Magazine’s website There’s an old Vermonter’s adage that you plant seeds on Town Meeting Day. It’s a big day: not only do we practice direct democracy here (we’ve dragged our kids to … Continue reading

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Maple Season

“Mom, you’re out of your mind! What are you doing?”  In the beginning of March, the days are noticeably longer and the sun actually has some warmth in it. Early mornings feel fresh. But the wood-stove is still lit, and … Continue reading

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Not Enough Room

There’s no question that browsing through seed and nursery catalogues is dangerous. The fruits and vegetables are luscious, colorful and perfect, and even though I have access to organic fresh fruits and vegetables through our local food co-op, I no … Continue reading

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Ahoy, Bok Choy

Cross-posted at Eating Well Magazine   They are already up! The Bok Choy (a variety of chinese cabbage) seeds have sprouted, only three days after they were planted.  Mind you, what I see are but the first embryonic leaves, the … Continue reading

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